2019 Family Trip to Leavenworth

Posted on Tuesday June 4, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

I’m still figuring out how I want to share more personal things about my life. While I’m still currently on Facebook (and probably this post will be shared there), I almost never post there. I’ve actually turned off the notifications (other than for messenger). Sometimes I post to Instagram, but that seems somewhat rare as well. I probably most frequently post things to Snapchat, as I like that it just disapears, but I don’t really have many friends there.

Sometimes I share photos sometimes directly with people through the Sharing Suggestions in Photos, but I’m still figuring it out. I have a couple hundred photos and video’s I took while we were in the Leavenworth area over Memorial Day. I wanted to share share something, so I put together this video using the Quik App on my iPad, which is such and easy way to put together a pretty neat looking video quickly.

You can also also see some some of the photos from our trip.

Photo of Leavenworth WA with Mountain in background Photo of Leavenworth WA with city in Black and White Photo of inside our Cabin outside of Leavenworth Photo of river outside of cabin Viking Hat inside the Wood Shop and Hat Shop in Leavenworth WA Hotdog Hat inside the Wood Shop and Hat Shop in Leavenworth WA Bunny Derby Hat inside the Wood Shop and Hat Shop in Leavenworth WA Hot Tub Photo in Leavenworth WA
A selection of some photos from our trip.
Photo of our Jacks Cabin
From the waterfront side, Jacks Cabin

We got the opportunity to stay in Jack’s Cabin, through airbnb which was a phenomenal experience. The video take you on a bit of tour, but there is really nothing like being able to walk out the back door and have a river and and little waterfall right outside.

Presentation at OSPI’s 2019 Student Support Conference - Better Together: Collaboration, Coordination, and Compassion

Posted on Friday May 24, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

The classrooms I get the opportunity to serve at the Pasco School District feels like a real privilege. I feel the work that I get to do is meaningful and really get to make an impact on the lives to staff and students. One of the reasons why it feels so meaningful to me is that fact that we try (while we don’t always implement) to use best practices to address our students needs.

Earlier this year, I got the opportunity to join the Washington State Association of School Social Workers and attend their annual conference. One of the presenters there from OSPI talked about the upcoming Student Support Conference and described that they would be making a request for proposals for conference presenters. I decided that I wanted to stretch myself some, although this is not the first conference that I have spoken at, and apply to present about our program and the best practices for classrooms serving students with emotional and behavioral disabilities.

The following is the slides from my presentation (or view on Notist) and I figured that I would share it hear as well. You can see more information about the conference at OSPI’s Student Support Website.

View Foundational Aspects of Evidence Based Classrooms: Supporting Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities on Notist.

It’s a little bit late tonight, but I will also say that while I didn’t get the opportunity to stay for both days of the conference (I had some other stuff come up that I really had to do), the other presentations that I got to sit in on were great and it’s good to see how much focus on both mental health and trauma there is for our students.

Privilege It’s a Thing and We Should Care

Posted on Monday April 15, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

Privilege is a topic that has been coming up and that I’ve been mulling over recently. I am a true believer that it is a topic that we should keep coming back to and reevaluating what our privilege is. When I was working on my degrees in social work at Eastern Washington University, I wrote a paper The Ethnicity of Non-Ethnicity: The Ethnic Autobiography of the Dominate Culture back in 2008.

Audiobook cover for Ta-Nehishi Coates Between The Worlds and Me

Between The Worlds and Me

by Ta-Nehishi Coates

Jacob says
A powerful story

I had been planning writing a review about Ta-Nehishi Coates audio book, Between The Worlds and Me, which I recently listened to (and I think think this blog post will suffice). Michiko Kakutani From the New York Times provides a good review of the book which is written as a type of letter to Coates’s teenage son about the realities, feelings, and symbolism associated with being Black in the United States. There were many points that stood out to me and gave me pause to think.

When coates was talking about his years growing up, and the safety of his body, really struck me that even with all of my travels and sometimes dangerous positions, that I’ve not really lived in it and my privilege that frequently they were positions I had put myself in. I was also struck by his comments about people who “think they are white.”

All in all, it was a powerful story and well worth a read or a listen. If you do listen to it like I did (and I must give a shoutout to public libraries and being able to download audiobooks), I love books that read by the author as I feel like I get even more of their voice. I was thankful that my mom recommended it to me.

While, I still haven’t finished the episode yet, I am still working my way through listening to Reconcilable Differences - Episode 101: Duke of Bits (Overcast Link and Website). I highly respect John and Merlin and appreciate their thoughtfulness in life and the way they broach all sorts of topics. In this episode they talk about both privilege and status and it was a great listen and through provoking. It is so important, as they said that people recognize that privilege is a thing and we have to keep reminding ourselves of that. The idea that how we can be fearless to be able to go about our life, and know that everything will be ok. That is so true for me and I can highly relate to saying that many times I can be fearless where not everybody else can.

Graphic stating what makes you so fearless

One area I’m able to be somewhat fearless in is pursing more education. I’m sure I will write more about this as time goes on, but I’ve been accepted to the California Institute of Integral Studies Doctorate in Transformative Studies program. The mere fact that I can look into pursing this puts me in such a position of privilege. And while I don’t have the type of excessive privilege of the somewhat recent news about U.S. Charges Dozens Of Parents, Coaches In Massive College Admissions Scandal I still have a whole lot more than many people.

Is it Spring Yet? Duck Pond & River Fun

Posted on Saturday March 16, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

It feels like Spring is finally here. We went to the Duck Pond at Columbia Park and fed the ducks.

I will say, after I was posting about buying bread to feed the ducks, a friend reached out to me and told me about the problems related to that, so you should consider feeding them something else. Fun video though.

Photo of sign stating not to feed ducks bread
Don’t Feed Ducks Bread.

Video shot on my GoPro and iPhone and Made by GoPro Quick using the song Straight West.

The 15 Hats (ahem, Roles) of Social Workers

Posted on Saturday February 16, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

Social workers all wear a number of different hats, or function in a number of different roles for their practice. In this video we talk about 15 different roles that social workers frequently put on. We go through and talk talk about the roles of counselor, case manager, broker, enabler, enabler, educator, facilitator, mediator, negotiator, manager, analyst/evaluator, consultant, integrator/coordinator, spokesperson, organizer/mobilizer, and advocate.

References

Barker, R.L. (1995). The social work dictionary (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: NASW Press.

Yessian, M.R., & Broskowski, A. (1983). Generalists in human-service systems: Their problems and prospects. Prentice Hall.

Zastrow, C., & Kirst-Ashman, K. (1997). U_nderstanding human behavior and the social environment (4th ed.)_. Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, Jr., G. H. (2015). Understanding generalist practice (7th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

Chechak, D. (2008 November 10)The roles of a social worker. Retrieved from https://www.scribd.com/doc/7852257/The-Roles-of-a-Social-Worker

Mutual Aid Model and Children with Special Needs

Posted on Thursday February 7, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

Helping the populations that we work with be able to connect together, feel as if they are in the same boat with persons with similar needs, and giving them opportunities to provide assistance to those persons is a effective way to help people feel supported. Mutual Aid groups are useful for all different types of needs, includes families of youth who have special needs. We discuss what Mutual Aid is and some of the ways that we facilitate groups with Mutual Aid as social workers.

Changing Problematic Behaviors, Principles of Operant Conditioning

Posted on Thursday January 31, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

Changing problematic behaviors is difficult. One evidence-based method for addressing difficult and disruptive behaviors whether at school or home is through reinforcing the behaviors that we want to see and punishing behaviors that we do not want to see. This general learning style is what is referred to as operant conditioning. For this video, we give some examples of how to provide these reinforcements and punishments.

ADHD Information for Practitioners, Parents, and Schools

Posted on Monday January 21, 2019 by Jacob Campbell.

A look into how to address Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) from the perspectives of clinicians, parents, and schools.

We focus on an article published in the Journal on Pediatrics in 2011 written by the Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and the Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. This article focuses on diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment.

Reference

American Psychiatric Association. (2013) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (Fifth ed.). Washington: American Psychiatric Association.

Centers for Disease Control and Prvention (2018, September 21) Attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Data & statistics. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html

Wolraich, M., Brown, L., Brown, R. T., DuPaul, G., Earls, M., Feldman, H. M., … Davidson, C. (2011). ADHD: Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics, 128(5), 1007–1022. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-2654.ADHD